As a previous post discussed, following a criminal charge, the accused could face parole or probation. While in some cases this occurs when an individual is released from jail or prison following a sentence, others could receive this penalty in place of incarceration or other consequences. When an individual is on probation or put on parole after incarceration, he or she is required to follow the terms and conditions of these. Failure to do this could result in additional or more severe penalties.

According to reports, the Tennessee Department of Corrections recently conducted a search of numerous vehicles in a regional sweep called “Operation: Clean up.” This occurred outside of the District 10 Johnson City field office and resulted in more than 300 vehicles being searched.

This sweep occurred in the parking lot, and its purpose was to ensure that offenders on community supervision are held accountable for any violations they have committed. This operation resulted in 24 arrests for charges that included drug possession and felony probation and parole violations. Additionally, over 35 citations were issued for charges such as driving with a suspended or revoked license and possession of drug paraphernalia.

While it is important to ensure that those on community supervision, such as those on probation or parole, follow the terms and conditions of their sentence, being charged with probation or a parole violation does not automatically mean the accused will face penalties. A criminal defense could be made, allowing the accused to avoid serious penalties.

Source: Wcyb.com, “Hundreds searched, dozens arrested in Operation: Clean Up,” Lenny Cohen, Dec. 9, 2015